Culture and Everyday Life

Description/Abstract of your Event: 
We will discuss how the unstable economics of the US affect working women and the family; creating Depression, Anxiety, and oppressive sexual attitudes in the US. This will then be compared with the economic and social position of East German women under Socialism.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
Since the outbreak of the global financial crisis, we have seen the rise of authoritarian regimes, of populist parties, of growing inequality… These trends diminish social cohesion and undermine democratic governance. Our future depends on how we will address the unprecedented number of political, social, and economic challenges. It is necessary to revitalize democratic governance and preserve civil rights and fundamental liberties. Arts, Culture, Humanism play a vital role in contemporary societies, and can contribute to achieving this goal. The current panel aspires to present some visions on creative democracy: in what ways the current wave of authoritarianism can be transformed through the Arts, Culture, Health Visions and Humanism. In particular, the speakers will examine how poets use language as a way to stabilize their sense of self, reclaim language and resist homogenized meaninglessness; how to narrate from a path of unity in diversity and embrace integration; some cultural perspectives from migrants in the US, and today´s initiatives on creative attempts to promote social change and civic engagement.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
This panel of three writer-speakers will present the lives, writings and legacy of three authors whose art became explicitly enmeshed within their revolutionary activism: John Reed, Langston Hughes and Sonia Sanchez.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
“No is not enough.” To save the planet from impending catastrophe, people need a positive vision of a better world and the roads leading to it. In other words, a credible picture of a possible Ecotopia and plausible account of how to get from here to there. But is “Another World” REALLY possible? To answer that question, we “Future Historians” have decided to perform a thought experiment. Our premise: if there is even once chance in a hundred for a better world – we ought to be able at least to imagine it. So we place ourselves in the position of Future Historians living in the year 2118 on a damaged, but stabilized, planet. Our project is to look backward a century and reconstruct HOW our great-grandparents got us from THEN - today’s capitalist death-spiral - to NOW - a sustainable, egalitarian global society free of war, oppression and exploitation. Future Historians is an international study group of scholar/activists from Moscow to California meeting bi-monthly via conference call and publishing our findings on a wiki at futurehistorians.org
Location: 
NYC
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
The central role of rhetorically shaped language in the determination of events has always been a central concern of the humanities. A major strand in literature has always concerned itself with the agency--and its emancipative capacities--associated with access to, and mastery of, literary tradition and its present trajectory. Experimental writers and publishers attempt to extend and re-make old forms and to create new ones as needed in order to bring "news" of the present to themselves and to readers in contemporary language adequate to the history we are living. Increasingly, in the age of Facebook, Google, Amazon, Apple and Goldman Sachs, language seems to be "pasted on" retrospectively to determinations of wealth creation whose violent, for-profit extraction is engineered with algorithms based on market monetizations, globally coordinated and maximized as returns on invested capital, without accountability to a general welfare. With the increasing pre-emption of the determinative role of non-monetized deliberative and imaginative language, what role does the poet, novelist, essayist, and memoirist, and their not-for-profit publishers have on influencing events, including political ones? A poet and three novelists, all of whom work in book publishing, will discuss how they understand and pursue political agency through both their creative and work lives in the midst of the relentless monetization of all value--including within independent literary presses--that underpins today's financialized global political economy.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
Like a generator in a hurricane, the Working Group on Globalization and Culture offers a collective presentation on “generation” to assess its theoretical purchase for a cultural studies laboring in a moment of widespread emergency. Generation is a keyword in understanding social conflicts over competing visions of the future: struggles over seeds and soil, and investments and inheritance. Insurgent movements are often viewed through the lens of new generations, and histories of migrant communities structured through generational concepts. In this panel, we reconsider the power of generational change and its meaning for inter-generational justice, while reflecting on the history of the generation and regeneration of life, power and energy. The Working Group on Globalization and Culture http://wggc.yale.edu/ is an interdisciplinary cultural studies laboratory that has been practicing collective research at Yale University since 2003. Recent projects have been published as “Going into Debt,” online on Social Text’s Periscope, and as “Spaces and Times of Occupation” in Transforming Anthropology; a collective interview regarding “Matters of Life and Death” recently appeared in French Review of American Studies.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
Feminist analysis is crucial for our understanding of male, white supremacist, and imperialist capitalism as a whole. Yet women’s liberation has too often been misunderstood and denigrated by many on the Left. Our speakers will talk about the relationship between feminism and the Left, and why it’s important for Leftists to study feminist theory and history, as well as why feminists should study Marxism. We will examine history, how the feminist movement’s relationship to the Left has evolved, and why a viable revolutionary movement needs to center feminist praxis, and fight to be inclusive of working class women from all backgrounds.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
The co-operative movement was built by people who took on the responsibility for their collective wellbeing in the face of government neglect, economic exclusion and cultural discrimination. As the modern economy increasingly denies vast sectors of the population basic amenities for decent life, this co-operative spirit is as critical as ever. However, over the years the co-op sector has become insular and poorly understood. A Silent Transformation sets out to explore the innovative self-help efforts of diverse communities across the Province of Ontario, which by addressing their needs collectively are helping to regain the radical vision of co-operation. In these communities are the seeds of economic democracy, global solidarity, and a new popular movement to transform society!