Environment

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

This discussion is about the socio-political components contained in the organizational efforts of jazz musicians: Community involvement, independently run artist spaces, self produced record labels, self produced festivals and concert performances will be the focus.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Large, imposed, infrastructure projects are a driving force of climate change. They are also a necessary component of our response to rising sea levels and changing weather patterns. Physical infrastructure has very visible, material effects: it holds water, changes the landscape, moves oil, sprouts leaks and poisons water. But a mere analysis of infrastructure-as-object conceals more than it illuminates. A closer examination of pipelines in Canada and Lebanon, real estate driven flood infrastructure in coastal Florida, and the legal response to the Dakota Access Pipeline protests reveals the economic, historical, political and racial relations that are embedded in and reproduced by these technologies for stopping floods and transporting fuel. Furthermore, the responses to the power structures articulated through infrastructure--occupations, sabotage--suggest a critique that exceeds the limits of environmentalism proper and strategies that would confront this political-economic behemoth at its point of production, whether that is the pipeline or the red line.

(Zack Culyer) Work, Staging, and Sabotage: Perceptibility and the Trans-Arabian Pipeline.
(Rosalind Donald) Combined and Uneven Real Estate Development: Miami' Segregation Driven Climate Change Response.
(R.H. Lossin) Critical Infrastructure Sabotage: Protecting Property and Suppressing Speech.
(Troy Vettese) Black Snake in the Grass: The Political Economy of Pipelines.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

How will climate change affect our lives? Where will its impacts be most deeply felt? Are we doing enough to protect ourselves from the coming chaos? Cities are ground zero for climate change, contributing the lion’s share of carbon to the atmosphere, while also lying on the frontlines of rising sea levels. Today, the majority of the world’s megacities are located in coastal zones, yet few of them are adequately prepared for the floods that will increasingly menace their shores. This panel will consider what's at stake globally for the most vulnerable communities who are are already feeling the impacts of climate change.

Scientists are predicting that as the southern hemisphere heats up the number of people migrating to the EU each year will triple. How can we link the struggles against neoliberalism, austerity, high housing costs and gentrification, with support for the rights of free movement across borders, for migrants displaced by the effects of climate change, and for environmental justice? What can we learn from urban movements already fighting to remake our cities in a more just and equitable way?

Location: 
NYC
Description/Abstract of your Event: 

We'll explore the roadblocks to decommissioning nuclear power plants, plans in the works, and what's needed to transition from nuclear power to a green energy society.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

This panel’s theme is on the linkages among economic and ecological crisis management, systemic resilience and points of vulnerability in advanced capitalist societies. Its point of departure is the capability of late capitalism to withstand the shock of economic upheavals, political scandals, environmental disasters, epidemics, and accelerating inequality -- crises arising largely or entirely from contradictions inherent in the system itself. It calls for theoretical inquiry into (1) the mechanisms (economic, political, cultural) used to contain or give the appearance of remediating disasters arising from contradictions in the capitalist system, and (2) how these mechanisms are featured as reforms or remediatioms in the short run but fail in the long run. Presentations at this panel will, hopefully, stimulate further research into the mechanisms leading to resilience and provide for organizers the grounds on which they can be demystified. Such theoretically attained knowledge opens the door for organizers seeking to illuminate these mechanisms at their most vulnerable points and thereby to strip away the props used by the capitalist system to maintains its legitimacy.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

This panel proposes to examine the relationship between the growth in socialism as a mainstream discourse and political platform in the United States since 2016, and the Green Party as an independent left electoral force. It asks what role the Green Party might have to play in spreading socialist political success, if any, and how the Party's platform and views might coincide with socialist ones. It also asks whether the Green Party is a place where a socialist caucus or faction has a place, what that group's perspective can or should be, and how it might develop if so.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Change happens from the bottom up. But what do you know about bottom-up? What are its characteristics, and those of it's opposite, top-down. Many people talk about how change happens from the bottom up. But not much is said beyond that. This Panel will go into depth on what bottom-up is, how it is different from top-down, and why we are going through a bottom-up revolution that offers opportunities to make change happen that were not available before.

Bottom-up is egalitarian, cooperative, interdependent, local, systemic, culture is tolerant, transparent, inclusive, empathic, as compared to top-down culture which is narrow-minded, rigid, authoritarian, narcissism encouraging, hierarchical, and centralized, with inequality, domination and secrecy. Top down challenges and bottom-up solutions and improvements will be discussed, with solutions.

Election reform, optimization and integrity issues and solutions will be explored. How top-down media and powerful influencers use framing, wording and mind games to hold back change and discourage activism.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

The event is about how solidarity missions between unions in Puerto Rico, USVI and the US after the hurricanes have helped to build solidarity in challenging privatization and austerity measures that harm workers and the public and, importantly, how workers in Puerto Rico are fighting back.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

This panel will debate how housing struggles and strategies can be critical for revolutionary change. In a time when housing unaffordability and environmental sustainability are great challenges — especially in global cities such as NYC — radical approaches offer possibilities to struggle for both better housing and post-capitalism. Squatting, expanding appropriate public (social) housing, and eco-collaborative models (eco-communes, eco-cohousing and ecovillages) are discussed with special reference to new book Small is Necessary: Shared Living on a Shared Planet (2018), urban squatters’ movements and leading housing organizations in Washington DC (ONE DC and Empower DC).

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Seymour Melman would have been 100 years old in 2017. We will examine his legacy in terms of his writing and activism, and discuss how to use his insights about political economy, manufacturing, the military economy and other topics in the light of the right-wing turn exemplified by Donald Trump. We will discuss the possibility of industrial policy from a working class perspective, including a large-scale infrastructure reconstruction program focusing on the needs of working people.

By “infrastructure” we mean more than simply physical construction of bridges but infrastructure in the sense of the backbones of our society- manufacturing, transportation, energy and information. These needs can be expressed as “design criteria”. Our vision means that the systems we support produce an environment that will replenish, not destroy our planet, and a manufacturing system that enhances skills and innovation, not one which degrades them. We are thinking about how to organize such a discussion and we thought that you might be interested in joining us in a discussion of the various aspects of a program of economic reconstruction - for example, an information system open and available to all; an energy system that is renewable not destructive; manufacturing that is productive and environmentally benign, designed for safety and skill; and a transportation system that serves to build a society, not destroy it.