Gender and Sexuality

Description/Abstract of your Event: 
A farmworker leader from the Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW) will share the history of the organization, conditions faced by farmworkers in the U.S. agricultural industry — including abuses such as sexual harassment and forced labor — and the transformative changes now in effect in the U.S. tomato industry as a result of the award-winning Fair Food Program in setting new farm labor standards, implementing fair wages, and eliminating abuses through its groundbreaking model of Worker Driven Social Responsibility. The workshop will also focus on the models through which the CIW has built power-- from the early days of general strikes and labor stoppages in the tomato fields of Southwest Florida, to the Campaign for Fair Food with successful boycotts of powerful multinational corporations, and then to the implementation of new worker directed standards in the agricultural industry. The workshop will be facilitated in both Spanish and English. There will be a question and answer session in which attendees can engage with farmworker leaders on their experiences as farmworkers, the movement for Fair Food and how they can be involved in the movement for farmworker justice.
Location: 
NYC
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
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Description/Abstract of your Event: 
At this historical juncture, the world is at a very dangerous point. The Doomsday Clock showing the risk of nuclear destruction of the world/humanity is now at 2 minutes to midnight. This is particularly meaningful because people who set the clock, atomic scientists, are well aware of the danger to the world. The US is associated with most of this danger. It has the biggest accumulation of wealth in the hands of individuals, yet according to the recent UN report, 40 million Americans live in poverty. The US has counter-terrorism activities in 76 countries, contributes to the humanitarian crises in Yemen and Palestine, has nearly 1000 foreign military bases around the world, and is ignoring the efforts of 122 countries in the UN to ban nuclear weapons. Yet, there are hopeful signs: Moral Mondays/Poor Peoples Movement; #meToo; #TimesUp; high school youths from Parkland stopping the NRA; the Families Belong Together movement. There is resistance rising up all over the US and the world. Along with the greatest repression there is the greatest resistance at the present time. But we need to be educated, to know which side we are on, to stand up. Women and children are most oppressed, and men, particularly white men have been oppressive for hundreds of years. Women for Racial and Economic Equality (WREE) was a progressive women’s peace activist organization from 1975 to 1995 that approached peace through the lens of racial and class issues. The Women’s Commission of the Movement for People’s Democracy is facilitating the revival of WREE as a vital, national organization. The panel will discuss the issues that the revived WREE will address, as well as suggesting appropriate activism in line with its vision of “Women leading the human race in a powerful movement in our communities to advocate for social and economic equality in collaboration with other women’s peace/labor organizations”. Panel members will discuss how WREE can address the issues of women in the workforce, racism, sexism, and world peace. Discussion will focus on women’s role in saving humanity, and men, from their own stupidity and arrogant behavior. A principal source about WREE is Harriet Hyman Alonso’s book, Peace As a Women’s Issue. As noted in the book, this is a class and race issue, not a man/woman issue. This class war divides us by race, gender, gender orientation, ethnicity, religion, nationality to distract us from focusing on the struggle as a class issue. WREE was destroyed because among all of the women’ organizations, it had more class consciousness than others. We want all to join in this struggle and join with WREE.
Location: 
LA
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
In the culture wars of contemporary America,intimate partner abuse ---often referred to as "domestic violence"---is at epidemic proportions throughout the society. This panel will analyze the scope and consequences of this epidemic as well as offer programmatic suggestions as to how to deal with such violence, both on an inter-personal and on a class, racial and cultural level.
Location: 
LA
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
The reputation of men as parents isn't a good one. The reasons are many and not without merit. "MEN ARE PARENTS, TOO!" looks the recent findings involving the importance of men as parents and it examines current notions of "gender equality and justice" between men and women.
Location: 
LA
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
While the anti-pornography feminist movement of the previous century was explicitly anti-Leftist, its successor has blurred the standard ideological divide, directing the sexual politics of a growing number of Western European political parties of the social-democratic Left. In the name of fighting 'sex trafficking', these forces are either indifferent to or opposed to sex workers organizing to improve their lives within the sex industry. Is the sexual austerity supported by these forces presaging the economic austerity that these parties are either flirting with or ultimately supporting? How are sex workers organizing to establish and defend their rights? Has the growing feminist presence within the porn industry modified its power dynamics? Among the grievances against the sex industry put forth by the left abolitionists, is there legitimate cause for concern?
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
This panel will have three or four speakers who are all involved in artistic creation, teaching, and political transformation through creative work. Each of the artists will briefly introduce their work, and talk about how it speaks about gender, race/ethnicity, and/or class dynamics. The artists will show excerpts of their works in order to open up discussion about the relationships between practice, theory and politically engaged art. The moderator will then introduce questions and problems for discussion. How do cultural background, gender and labor history inform artistic works? What are the benefits and potential problems of collaborative efforts? How can the art contribute to the political struggles and help communities face psychological trauma of oppressed groups? What is the relationship between embodied memory and artistic expression? How can complex history of arts and artistic representation help us unravel influence of consumerism and consumerist ideals on bodies and minds? The problematic of how spectatorship/witnessing relates to subject's coming to being and political awareness about the body, femininity, violence, and trauma, will be opened up in the context of education. Before sharing insights The participants will be invited to introduce themselves, talk about their political and individual histories and practices.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
Black, lesbian, dancer-poet performance art duo Nia & Ness invite you to view excerpts of their evening-length piece, run., created in part during their BAX 2017 Summer Space Grant, run. is a story of the couple’s daily struggles and joys while living in NYC, with all original music by Garrett Miller. Following their performance, Nia & Ness will share their ideas about how their love and art are intrinsically intertwined with their activism.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
For at least five hundred years of global colonial occupation and imperial plunder, the devaluation, abuse, and exploitation of womxn has gone hand-in-hand with the depletion and degradation of the Earth. By the same token, however, Indigenous, peasant, racially marginalized, and other womxn targeted by cishteropatriarchy and anthropocentrism have been on the frontlines of mobilizations for broad-based autonomy, dignity, equity, justice, and sustainability, from the Chipko movement of India to the neo-Zapatista uprising of southwestern Mexico. As interlocking global crises intensify, the ecofeminist alternatives articulated by these womxn become more important than ever to the fight for another world. This panel will feature reportbacks on ecofeminist interventions from the Americas and South Asia. Its presenters will discuss how community gardens and urban farms, permaculture and agroecology projects, biodiversity farms, traditional medical practices, and counter-hegemonic learning initiatives across these parts of the world are recentering multiply marginalized womxn at the same time as they address pressing threats to land, food, and water sovereignty.