Health

Description: 
"Socialist feminists have long pointed to the fact that capitalists rely on the reproductive labor, usually of women, to create and sustain productive workers. This includes giving birth, but also the conditions and institutions under which workers are raised and reproduced. Socialist feminists consider how women’s collective reproductive health is dictated by capitalism’s need to reproduce labor power. Such an analysis allows us to broaden our solutions from individual rights to collective justice. But how does reproductive justice also inform and enrich our socialist feminist analysis? Incorporating a reproductive justice framework prioritizes the fact that personal bodily autonomy is foundational to struggles for freedom. By interweaving a socialist feminist and reproductive justice analysis, socialist feminists move beyond the question: can you pay for your abortion? We also ask, why does one’s ability to pay for child care influence one’s decision to have a child? Why does the labor to sustain that child fall disproportionately on the backs of women, particularly working class women of color and women from the global south? In this panel, we will explore the many ways in which a reproductive justice framework can sharpen our socialist feminist understanding of collective justice."
Location: 
LA
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Description: 
Health-care justice activists have worked for many years toward a national health insurance (single payer) solution to the U.S.'s corporate, for-profit health care mess. We continue in this struggle, which we will report on in the first of two sessions. We will discuss state and local organizing, and in the second half, describe the work of "Health Care for the 99%," a track of the Occupy Wall Street movement. In both sessions there will be a focus on discussion and strategizing.
Location: 
LA
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Description: 
Only a national health system, based on an extension of the Medicare plan to cover all citizens, can rescue the country from a private insurance system that demands ever larger premiums, pays less to doctors, and provides ever dwindling services to subscribers. The insurance industry gets to keep the rest free and clear, a substantial sum for shuffling papers. Also, in New York City, the closing of hospitals--starting with St. Vincent's in Greenwich Village, but with threatened extensions to communities in other neighborhoods and boroughs--signals a significant and dangerous step in the reduction of healthcare services. Will hospitals become a relic of the past (because they are so expensive to maintain), to be replaced by clinics, "docs in a box," and whatever else the market will bear? Who will be underserved? And who will profit? Is there a way to stop these trends?
Location: 
LA
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Description: 
The US healthcare system is the most expensive (as a percent of GDP) of all the advanced industrial countries, and despite that produces healthcare outcomes that rank among the lowest. This difference is both a result and cause of the extraordinarily high profits in the industry, and more broadly of being a healthcare for profit system. This panel looks carefully at the political economy of the US Medical Industrial Complex, the current Affordable Healthcare Act, and what would be necessary to create an acceptable alternative.
Location: 
LA
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Description: 
Pharmaceutical sector is marked by two main attributes: its inmmense concentration, and the important role played by intellectual property rights (IPRs). These atributes remain mostly concentrated in developed countries. Regarding their concentration, the World Health Organization, in the late 1990s, showed that 92.9 of world pharmaceutical production was located in high- income countries. Concerning IPRs, pharmaceutical originator firms have relied on patents, in order to contend the high cost of research and development for new medicines. According to the statistics of the World Intellectual Property Organization, more than 80 percent of pharmaceutical, pharmo- chemical, and biotechnological patent applications recorded in the period 1995- 2006 originated from just six countries (United States of America, Japan, Germany, France, United Kingdom, Switzerland). The inclusion of IPRs clauses into the free trade agreements has impeded the entrance of generic medicines into developing countries to treat diseases, such as cancer, AIDS, or tuberculosis. These clauses have obliged developing countries to buy originator firms their branded medicines, restricting health public budgets. In this panel, we will explore different issues regarding access to medicines related with TRIPS clauses, such as the role of developing countries, such as India, who has used compulsory licenses to guarantee the production of generic medicines; or the role of NGOs (e.g, Doctors without Borders).
Location: 
LA
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Description: 
New York City has no population- and needs-based process to connect health services to the actual needs of its varied communities. Rather, services are created or eliminated mainly on the basis of market, mainly profit-driven, considerations. The continuing crisis of hospitals in many parts of Brooklyn illustrates this well. True community-based health planning seeks to provide the data and analysis that can connect the needs of each community to the services that are available to it. This requires an effort to involve the members of geographically-defined communities in an open public processes to improve the availability and quality of healthcare services as a means towards improving its health status. Above all, we need a means of providing the data and analysis that program planners and advocates can use to assess the health care needs of each community and identify resource gaps as well as excess resources that could be distributed more rationally and equitably. This sessions addresses the nature of such a system, the recent history of community struggles to retain necessary services, and the ways in which a needs-based health system might be achieved.
Location: 
LA
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Description: 
Abstract will follow shortly.