Housing

Description/Abstract of your Event: 
Our task today is not to imagine pies in the sky for a future that can always be postponed, but to think and act on what Andre Gorz called "concrete utopias". The possibilities for change are not in the distance; they are all around us and available. It’s a matter of breaking the spell of the crisis and seeing and seizing these useful, world-changing tools. For a long time it seemed as though the future would always look like the present, and imagining utopia was largely a theoretical exercise. Over the past 10 years, since the "Great Recession" of 2008, this situation has been changing, as the neoliberal global order that sustained the idealization of liberal parliamentarianism as "the endpoint of mankind's ideological evolution" entered into a prolonged and profound crisis. Today, homeless populations are exploding in major US cities, wages remain flat or are falling, and yet CEO bonuses have rebounded to pre-crash levels. But there is no legitimacy for this growing inequality. No one believes that a rising tide lifts all boats and the faith in capitalist realism (TINA) is losing ground. Today, more and more people are recovering the ability – and realizing the urgency -- of imagining life differently. How do we use this moment of the crisis of neoliberalism, only persisting now in a zombielike state, to repudiate the equation of markets with democracy? How do we shatter the fallacy of this central premise of neoliberalism to actualize resolutely concrete but radically utopian futures?
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
Like a generator in a hurricane, the Working Group on Globalization and Culture offers a collective presentation on “generation” to assess its theoretical purchase for a cultural studies laboring in a moment of widespread emergency. Generation is a keyword in understanding social conflicts over competing visions of the future: struggles over seeds and soil, and investments and inheritance. Insurgent movements are often viewed through the lens of new generations, and histories of migrant communities structured through generational concepts. In this panel, we reconsider the power of generational change and its meaning for inter-generational justice, while reflecting on the history of the generation and regeneration of life, power and energy. The Working Group on Globalization and Culture http://wggc.yale.edu/ is an interdisciplinary cultural studies laboratory that has been practicing collective research at Yale University since 2003. Recent projects have been published as “Going into Debt,” online on Social Text’s Periscope, and as “Spaces and Times of Occupation” in Transforming Anthropology; a collective interview regarding “Matters of Life and Death” recently appeared in French Review of American Studies.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
The panel will lead a discussion on Domestic Violence and the revictimization of survivors through underfunding of services and available services that are unable, or unwilling to help. Specific topics will include law enforcement's role (and failures) in Domestic Violence, financial support, mental health needs, and others.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
This panel will lead a discussion around the mental health crisis in America. Topics will include deficiencies in mental health services regarding rural and urban populations, generational concerns, veterans' services, homelessness, wrongful incarceration of diagnosed youth, lack of funding for services, as well as qualified practitoners, and others.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
The co-operative movement was built by people who took on the responsibility for their collective wellbeing in the face of government neglect, economic exclusion and cultural discrimination. As the modern economy increasingly denies vast sectors of the population basic amenities for decent life, this co-operative spirit is as critical as ever. However, over the years the co-op sector has become insular and poorly understood. A Silent Transformation sets out to explore the innovative self-help efforts of diverse communities across the Province of Ontario, which by addressing their needs collectively are helping to regain the radical vision of co-operation. In these communities are the seeds of economic democracy, global solidarity, and a new popular movement to transform society!
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
What do a fake pimp and prostitute have to do with ACORN, America’s largest anti-poverty organization? A power player in the 2008 election of President Barack Obama, community organizing group ACORN was targeted by conservatives, who accused them of committing voter fraud. ACORN critics found allies in amateur journalists James O’Keefe and Hannah Giles whose undercover hidden camera investigations smeared ACORN, and helped launch a new entity called Breitbart Media. ACORN and the Firestorm is a thrilling recount of recent political history by award winning directors, Reuben Atlas (Brothers Hypnotic) and Sam Pollard (Two Trains Runnin’), ACORN became a major player in the 2008 presidential election that resulted in Barack Obama’s victory. Big businesses, Republicans and right-wing activists attacked the group, firing accusations of voter fraud and government waste at the left- leaning organization. Right-wing opposition found unexpected allies in a pair of amateur journalists who posed as a pimp and prostitute hoping to expose ACORN via hidden-camera. The ensuing political drama spawned the now-omnipresent Breitbart Media, and served as a prescient foreshadowing of today’s political climate. In an age where fake news and truthiness obscure reality, ACORN and the Firestorm tells a deep, true, moving story about what lies beneath a divided America.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
In this panel and participatory discussion we will explore how Cooperation Jackson in Jackson, Mississippi, and Barcelona en Comu in Barcelona, Spain, have brought social movements directly into elected office to expand the potential of democracy to be truly accountable to the needs of the people - and where we can go from here in our towns and cities. We will take a deeper look at how solidarity economies and worker cooperatives build strength and long term equity in communities of color, highlighted by the Jackson experience, how the battle against inequality and for housing is embedded in local struggles inside and outside the ballot box, as shown in Barcelona, explore how the paradigm shift in municipalism's commitment to feminizing politics underpins the radical nature of the municipalist hypothesis for change, and where we will go next in building a vibrant network of local movements.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
Progressives are sometimes fooled by governmental programs that offer to solve social problems, including the provision of affordable housing. Historically, FDR's New Deal and LBJ's Great Society did hand out billions of dollars and, for a time some people benefited, but some claim the money would have been better spent if it were just given away in grants to those deserving low income housing. The panel identifies an innovative use of community land trusts to permanently provide affordable housing, by leveraging mixed income and commercial rental of CLT-owned land to sustain availability of the majority of units for tenants at 60% of AMI.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
This panel’s theme is on the linkages among economic and ecological crisis management, systemic resilience and points of vulnerability in advanced capitalist societies. Its point of departure is the capability of late capitalism to withstand the shock of economic upheavals, political scandals, environmental disasters, epidemics, and accelerating inequality -- crises arising largely or entirely from contradictions inherent in the system itself. It calls for theoretical inquiry into (1) the mechanisms (economic, political, cultural) used to contain or give the appearance of remediating disasters arising from contradictions in the capitalist system, and (2) how these mechanisms are featured as reforms or remediatioms in the short run but fail in the long run. Presentations at this panel will, hopefully, stimulate further research into the mechanisms leading to resilience and provide for organizers the grounds on which they can be demystified. Such theoretically attained knowledge opens the door for organizers seeking to illuminate these mechanisms at their most vulnerable points and thereby to strip away the props used by the capitalist system to maintains its legitimacy.
Description/Abstract of your Event: 
This panel will debate how housing struggles and strategies can be critical for revolutionary change. In a time when housing unaffordability and environmental sustainability are great challenges — especially in global cities such as NYC — radical approaches offer possibilities to struggle for both better housing and post-capitalism. Squatting, expanding appropriate public (social) housing, and eco-collaborative models (eco-communes, eco-cohousing and ecovillages) are discussed with special reference to new book Small is Necessary: Shared Living on a Shared Planet (2018), urban squatters’ movements and leading housing organizations in Washington DC (ONE DC and Empower DC).