Labor

Location: 
NYC
Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Organized labor is panicking about the forthcoming Supreme Court decision for Janus v. AFSCME Council 31, fearful that all of the U.S. may soon become a "right-to-work state." And yet public school teachers in "red states" like West Virginia and Oaklahoma are conducting walkouts despite existing labor law -- and labor "leaders." What can labor leftists learn from this new show of militancy?

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

This discussion is about the socio-political components contained in the organizational efforts of jazz musicians: Community involvement, independently run artist spaces, self produced record labels, self produced festivals and concert performances will be the focus.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

The exploitation and austerity imposed by capitalism has triggered protests and movements from Egypt, Greece, and France to Ferguson, Baltimore and now West Virginia in the U.S. But these struggles met their limits and dissipated or were channeled back into the system. Nowhere has the working class provided an independent, let alone revolutionary, perspective to current struggles. Many of those seeking revolutionary change have turned away from the working class as the revolutionary model of the 21st century, claiming that the proletariat, its workers’ councils, the revolutionary party, and the socialist program have are no longer necessary, and that we need a new political approach.

We disagree with this perspective. The potential and necessity of the working class to once again provide a leadership to struggles that challenge the status quo is just as true today as it ever was. But it is important to carry out regular revolutionary activity in the working class and not to simply wait around for periods of mass upheaval. Come to a presentation and discussion of our perspectives and efforts in both France and the U.S. for building a revolutionary organization in the working class today, and hear about our concrete experience organizing and participating in the recent railroad workers’ strikes and the student movement against austerity in France.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Large, imposed, infrastructure projects are a driving force of climate change. They are also a necessary component of our response to rising sea levels and changing weather patterns. Physical infrastructure has very visible, material effects: it holds water, changes the landscape, moves oil, sprouts leaks and poisons water. But a mere analysis of infrastructure-as-object conceals more than it illuminates. A closer examination of pipelines in Canada and Lebanon, real estate driven flood infrastructure in coastal Florida, and the legal response to the Dakota Access Pipeline protests reveals the economic, historical, political and racial relations that are embedded in and reproduced by these technologies for stopping floods and transporting fuel. Furthermore, the responses to the power structures articulated through infrastructure--occupations, sabotage--suggest a critique that exceeds the limits of environmentalism proper and strategies that would confront this political-economic behemoth at its point of production, whether that is the pipeline or the red line.

(Zack Culyer) Work, Staging, and Sabotage: Perceptibility and the Trans-Arabian Pipeline.
(Rosalind Donald) Combined and Uneven Real Estate Development: Miami' Segregation Driven Climate Change Response.
(R.H. Lossin) Critical Infrastructure Sabotage: Protecting Property and Suppressing Speech.
(Troy Vettese) Black Snake in the Grass: The Political Economy of Pipelines.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

This workshop will ask participants to look at how they focus on their core values while expanding their organizations. What practices do they use to stay intentional when welcoming new alliances to their actions? How does their group convey their values while allowing for difference?

The workshop is participant-oriented. Early exercises determine the issues while the breakout session concentrates on identifying and sharing non-patriarchal solutions. Breakout sessions might include topics such as integration, diversity, limits, inclusion, and others. Time will be left at the end for a summary of solutions!

Location: 
NYC
Description/Abstract of your Event: 

We'll explore the roadblocks to decommissioning nuclear power plants, plans in the works, and what's needed to transition from nuclear power to a green energy society.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Rank-and-file healthcare workers talk about building resistance on the job and in their unions, organizing the unorganized, the fight for universal healthcare, being a socialist at the workplace, and strategies for a militant new labor movement.

BACKGROUND: For the majority of people in the US, health care is a system in crisis – a landscape marred by subpar services, unequal access, racial inequalities, millions uninsured, rising premiums and soaring debt. This trillion-dollar industry reaps massive profits for hospital execs, insurance corporations, pharmaceuticals and technology firms while patient care facilities get the chopping block and working-class communities struggle with prohibitive costs. In New York City alone, 16 hospitals have been shut down since 2003. Heightened competition, management-by-stress, technological advancements, rapacious profit-mongering, neoliberal policies, and the weakened position of labor unions have led to intolerable conditions for workers and patients.

However, healthcare workers are not taking things lying down. In recent years, nurses have been at the forefront of labor battles and audacious strike actions. The force of healthcare workers – many women, immigrant, of color, and more unionized than other sectors – supported Black Lives Matter, went on strike, fought for better staffing and universal healthcare. Those watching the recent strike wave among teachers have pointed to the strategic importance of the unrest brewing among educational and healthcare workers. Join a discussion with frontline workers who are practicing and exploring what it means to be socialist on the job, in the union, and in a brutal healthcare system.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

From day of his inauguration as president, Donald Trump has faced a broad, multifaceted resistance that ranges from neolliberal Democrats such as Hillary Clinton and Andrew Cuomo, to progressives such as Bernie Sanders, Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand, and Elizabeth Warren, on the one hand to social movements of women, immigrants, labor and antifa on the other. How do we characterize Trump's presidency? How do we view the Resistance? How will all of this impact the midterm elections? And where should we socialists be and what should we do?

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Something remarkable is happening in the UK, the Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn is, with the support of an energized grassroots base, articulating an economic platform that breaks with neoliberal orthodoxy to outline what an economy that works for the many, not the few, could look like. This new economics is grounded in "alternative models of ownership"—an innovative agenda that builds upwards from community wealth building frameworks for cooperative and municipally owned development at the city level to democratized large scale public ownership at the regional and national level.

This panel will discuss the origins of this platform (including the connections between Cleveland and Preston), the ongoing and accelerating efforts to implement it at the local level while Labour remains out of government (like Corbyn's new "community wealth building unit"), and what lessons the US Left can learn about how a popular economic agenda can be built to challenge the ownership patterns of corporate capitalism at all scales.