NYC
2018
Event Type: 
Panel
Room: 
1.66
Timeslot: 
Session 4: Saturday, June 2nd: 4:00 - 5:50pm
Host/Sponsor(s): 
Event Organizer: 
Description: 
Recent years have seen an explosion of protest against police brutality and repression—most dramatically in Ferguson, Missouri, where longheld grievances erupted in violent demonstrations following the police killing of Michael Brown. Among activists, journalists, and politicians, the conversation about how to respond and improve policing has focused on accountability, diversity, training, and community relations. Unfortunately, these reforms will not produce results, either alone or in combination. The core of the problem must be addressed: the nature of modern policing itself. This talk attempts to spark public discussion by revealing the tainted origins of modern policing as a tool of social control. How can we support the work of police abolition groups and make connections between police abolition and other social movements? How can we reinvent and demystify the language of policing in order to better prepare activists—and anyone with an open mind—on one of the key issues of our time: police brutality. What models of resistance can we look to in the struggle against police violence and agains the institutions of police and the carceral system?

Participants

Yasmina Price is a Brooklyn-based organizer committed to the development of robust networks of leftists from the African diaspora and abolishing prisons, police and all oppressive structures. Growing up in Niger, France, and Italy, she is dedicated to working towards to dismantling the... Read more
Alex S. Vitale is Professor of Sociology at Brooklyn College and coordinator of the Policing and Social Justice Project there. He has spent the last 25 years writing about policing and consults both police departments and human rights organizations internationally. He is also a frequent essayist,... Read more
David Correia is an associate professor in the Department of American Studies at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of Properties of Violence: Law and Land Grant Struggle in Northern New Mexico.
Tyler Wall is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Tennessee.