Framing Resistance: Cultural Identities & Protest Marches

Panel/Workshop Organizer Last Name: 
Salek
Panel/Workshop Organizer First Name: 
Fabiola
Panel/Workshop Organizer Affiliation: 
York College-CUNY
Abstract: 
Surreal was voted the 2016 word of the year. In 2016, the US elected a president who freely makes anti-feminist comments, and who boasts of grabbing women inappropriately. Liberal women, men, and children are outraged. Worldwide protests took place on January 21, 2017, the day after President Trump took office. These presentations examines the protest signs from the Women’s March in Washington DC, New York City, and Los Angeles; as well as the online protests. An analysis of the placards cannot be done on a single level because the language and imagery are layered one upon the other to yield multi-model signs that advocate women’s rights, herstories, and a host of policies, such as reproductive rights and personal freedoms. The analysis of the protest“art” unveiled such linguistic devices as humor, word play, metonymy, mirroring, deictic references, and parallelism to convey strong messages of disapproval and objection to President Trump and his administration, his policies, and their ramifications. A different kind of identity resistance was waged in Algiers through the Berber resistance movement calling for the recognition of the Berber language and culture by the government, which had been adamant about maintaining the identity of Algeria and Algerians as Arab. It was only in 2002, forty years after the independence of Algeria from France that the Berber language, culture and heritage were given constitutional by the Algerian government. Every April 20th has been commemorated as the anniversary of the “Berber Spring.”
York CUNY